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Volume 7, Issue 2 (June 2017)
Announcement
 
 
The book Social Futures of Singapore Society, based on the proceedings at BSI Conference 2016, will be published by World Scientific in the third quarter of this year. Containing a total of 10 chapters, the book addresses issues in thinking about the future of Singapore society and areas related to healthcare, education, giving, social media, social identities, economic development, and relationships between people and government. Contributors include Arnoud De Meyer, Jeremy Lim, Irene Ng, Quah Ley Hoon, Ang Peng Hwa, Melissa Kwee, Arun Mahizhnan, Tommy Koh, Chan Heng Chee, Euston Quah, Lily Kong and David Chan. More information are available on the World Scientific website.
 
BSI Research
 
The findings from two research studies, supported by BSI and led respectively by SMU Associate Professor Angela Leung and BSI Research Fellow Liu Pan, have been accepted for presentation at the following international conferences:
 
Leung, A. K.-y., Liou, S., Miron-Spektor, E., Koh, B., Chan, D., Eisenberg, R., & Schneider, I. (2017). East Asia and Middle Ground Approach: The Case of Creativity. Academy of Management Meetings, Georgia, USA.
 
Liu, P., Chan, D., Qiu, L., Tov, W., & Tong, V.J.C. (2017). Effects of Cultural Tightness and Social Network Density on Emotional Expressions: A Large-Scale Study of Impression Management by Facebook Users. Asian Conference on Cultural Studies 2017, Kobe, Japan.
 
The following are recent publications in academic outlets based on works associated with BSI:
 
Chan, D. (2017). Situational judgment tests. In Rogelberg, S. (Ed.). Encyclopedia of Industrial and Organizational Psychology (2nd Edition). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
 
Chan, D. (2017). Values, styles, and motivational constructs. In J. L. Farr and N. T. Tippins (Eds.), Handbook of employee selection (2nd Edition). New York, NY: Routledge.
 
Hoffman, M. E., Chan, D., Chen, G., Dansereau, F., Rousseau, D., & Schneider, B. (in press). Panel Interview: Reflections on Multilevel Theory, Measurement, & Analysis. In S. E. Humphrey & J.M. LeBreton (Eds.,), Handbook for multilevel theory, measurement and analysis. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.
 
Lievens, F., & Chan, D. (2017). Practical intelligence, emotional intelligence, and social intelligence. In J. L. Farr and N. T. Tippins (Eds.), Handbook of employee selection (2nd Edition). New York, NY: Routledge.
 
Leung, A. K.-y., Liou, S., Miron-Spektor, E., Koh, B., Chan, D., Eisenberg, R., & Schneider, I. (in press). Middle Ground Approach to Paradox: Within- and Between-Culture Examination of the Creative Benefits of Paradoxical Frames.  Journal of Personality and Social Psychology.
 
Insights from Behavioural Sciences
 
In this regular section on Insights from Behavioural Sciences, we feature an invited commentary where Professor David Chan explained the psychology of ambivalence when we have mixed feelings and thoughts about a person, group, decision or issue. He discussed the motivational, belief and emotional conflicts involved and proposed that we focus on goals, insights, values and expectations to deal with ambivalence. He illustrated the discussion with examples from areas relating to personal, work and societal issues. The article was published in three different languages in the three newspapers respectively.
 
The Straits Times, 10 June 2017 [Link]
Lianhe Zaobao, 17 June 2017 [Link]
Berita Harian, 27 June 2017 [Link]
 
We also feature comments by Professor Chan in interviews for a television programme and three newspapers on recent security issues in Singapore.
 
The Talking Point, 22 June 2017 [Link] (comments by Prof Chan at 4:22 to 5:46)
The Straits Times Online, 12 June 2017 [Link]
Lianhe Zaobao, 13 June 2017 [Link]
Berita Harian, 14 June 2017 [Link]
Berita Harian, 22 June 2017 [Link]
 
Applications from Behavioural Sciences
 
In this regular section on Applications from Behavioural Sciences, we feature an invited commentary in which Professor David Chan explained the psychology of apologies. He discussed why a sincere apology is good for both the offending and offended parties, how to apologise sincerely, and how to discern between true apologies and crafty ones. The article was published in The Straits Times on 6 May 2017. [Link]
 

About BSI
 
The Behavioural Sciences Institute (BSI) is a multi-disciplinary research institute for creating, disseminating and applying scientific knowledge about human behaviours in various social, organisational and cultural settings. For more information on BSI, please refer to our website. Should you have any further enquiries, do contact us with the email or phone contact details provided below.
 
:http://bsi.smu.edu.sg
:bsi [at] smu.edu.sg
:+65 6828 0300